Daniela Serodio's posts

Naturalizing Park Land in Richmond Hill

Woman planting and American hazelnut shrub
In this year alone, over 7,000 square meters of park land have been naturalized by Richmond Hill community members. Throughout the spring and fall of 2019, LEAF, the City of Richmond Hill and The Regional Municipality of York have hosted five planting events in Meander Park. With the help of 480 community members, we have planted 1,350 native shrubs and trees.

A Day with the Junior Urban Forest Rangers

Two junior urban forest rangers posing in front of a house
Every summer, LEAF hosts a one-of-a-kind urban forest experience for City of Toronto day campers. The campers, ages six through 12, join our staff at Riverdale Park East and partake in a series of fun and interactive activities with the aim of educating the kids on the value of the urban forest around us. This year, I was lucky enough to join the Junior Urban Forest Rangers (JUFR) for a day and see the action in person!

The #myBackyardBiodiversity Challenge

Chipmunk on a wooden fence
LEAF and the Toronto Wildlife Centre (TWC) are joining forces to raise awareness on the connection between urban wildlife and the urban forest. Supported by Ontario Power Generation, the Backyard Biodiversity campaign has returned for 2019! And, this year, we are challenging Toronto residents to share what they’re doing to improve our #BackyardBiodiversity.

Greening Community Housing Properties Grows More than Trees

TCHC Kendleton property
May 15th, 2019 might have seemed like a regular Wednesday morning, just another spring day, but there was something celebratory in the air as the sun broke free from the clouds. Gathered by the community garden at 111 Kendleton Dr were a group of dedicated and inspired people, including LEAF staff, our program partners and local residents. Together, we were celebrating the successful completion of the first phase of a very special project which aims to increase tree canopy cover while increasing community engagement at Toronto Community Housing properties.

In Support of Backyard Trees

Hackberry in a backyard
We all know that trees produce oxygen and clean our air. But they do so much more! Residents of communities with increased tree coverage enjoy a multitude of health, social and economic benefits. So, how can we increase our tree canopy in order to enjoy these benefits? A neighbourhood’s canopy extends well beyond the trees lining the streets and growing in parks. Though sometimes overlooked, residential backyards hold great potential for growing our urban forest! Backyard trees add privacy, increase property value and help homeowners cut down on energy costs.
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